Saturday, February 8, 2020

Access to Healthcare as an Ethical Issue Research Paper

Access to Healthcare as an Ethical Issue - Research Paper Example These health conditions are proved to be very expensive to manage. Likewise, other chronic health conditions such as heart ailments are very costly to treat. Due to the elevated costs of maintaining these health conditions, the cost of health care has also plummeted. Consequently, some of the societal and collective courses of action aimed at improving and making healthcare accessible to everyone such as Medicare have been adversely affected by this costly management. This is the reason why a substantial percentage of Americans do not have health insurance. One of the issues of ethical or moral concern in the U.S. facing leaders in healthcare today is improving access to health. The issue of inability to access healthcare has remained an issue of concern in the field of healthcare over the recent past. According to Trotochaud (2006), â€Å"In 2002, almost 85% of the US population reported having healthcare insurance coverage from employer-based insurance (55%), Medicaid, other means-tested programs (17%), or Medicare (13%). The remaining 15% of the population had no health insurance coverage of any type.† (166). Many critics of the US health care system have been arguing that the US government does not deal with or tackle the ever increasing expenditure on healthcare. Americans on the other hand believe that issues of accessibility and expenditure incurred on health care are issues of great worry. According to Trotochaud (2006), the issue o f access to healthcare is concerned with issues of fairness and impartiality. Citizens of a democratic nation have the right to fair and impartial allocation of national assets. To effectively comprehend on the issue of access to healthcare as an ethical issue, it is important to categorize fairness and impartiality to healthcare into access and allocation. Access to healthcare means that individuals possessing the right to access healthcare are able to obtain it. Allocation on the other hand includes the procedures that are incorporated in deciding the percent of national income and assets will be dispersed to cater for healthcare services in the community. The issue of access to healthcare in the US is a political and policy problem. What makes it unethical or immoral is uneven and lopsided access. As a leader, it would be important to implement plans of action that would level the ground and ensure access to healthcare is even. In fact methodical studies conducted in the past hav e elucidated the fact that three quarters of Americans believe that the social order and the world in general is ought to guarantee universal and equal access to healthcare for all individuals. More than half of Americans believe that the issue of access to healthcare is more of a moral issue as compared to being a political and economic predicament. There are certain moral or ethical issues in access to healthcare including equal opportunity for all, fairness, as well as consideration and sympathy. Leaders have been involved in trying to make the American dream a reality. I believe one of the components of the American Dream is equal opportunities for all Americans in all aspects of the society. Therefore, individual well being is a significant component geared to attainment of equal opportunities for all. When some communities in the US fail to have an equal opportunity in accessing healthcare, then this becomes amoral issue. This is contrary to

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

U.S. television networks Essay Example for Free

U.S. television networks Essay Television is nowadays one of the most popular sources of information, so there is a number of networks, participating in the market competition and thus remaining sensitive to the audience’s beliefs and preferences; at the same time they to great extent shape the needs and culture of the population. The present paper argues that the popularity of a television network greatly depends upon its autonomy and ability to both combine creation and broadcast of a TV-product, as well as upon its rejection and deconstruction of the objective reality, which the target audience is likely to criticize, for the purpose of weaving an alternative world, dominated by the key values of the potential consumers. In her article, Johnson touches briefly the institutional structure and underlying economics of CBS and PAX-TV, high-rated and extremely popular networks, which seek to provide uniform TV-products around the country; moreover, they are also similar in their business approach: â€Å"Both networks share strikingly similar business strategies, branding appeals, the same flagship programs produced by Martha Williamson [†¦]† (Johnson, 2004, p.404). Whereas CBS has quite a democratic and friendly slogan, PAX-TV states its mission in quite religious terms; however, both networks are established by media magnates with orientation to pious audiences, so they share their programming content freely. However, there is also one non-commercial network called PBS, which positions itself as non-profit and thus does not own any broadcasting stations; as a result, it cannot reach the desirable uniformity of broadcasting CBS and PAX-TV demonstrate. According to Meehan Byars, two decades ago, there began a tendency for large companies’ ownership of TV channels; these corporations often engaged with the creation of their own TV-products like films and shows, so they were becoming increasingly more autonomous in the selection of the information to broadcast. Furthermore, the advent and popularization of commercial cable television allowed these large TV-industry players to ensure they had a stable group of loyal consumers (Meehan Byars, 2004, p. 92).   As opposed to this obvious integration of channels into large companies, it is possible to exemplify the abovementioned PBS, coordinated by several non-profit organizations, which seek to provide free and independent broadcasting.   Johnson observes that the audiences of CBS and PAX-TV are composed mainly of conservative, family-oriented middle-class and working-class Americans, who believe in God and greatly value conversations on religious topics. The owners of the two networks assume that the existing American culture is not fully tolerable by Americans themselves, especially by the older generation, and therefore seek an alternative reality, primarily through programming and display of movies and shows based upon idyllic pastoral and religious themes. As it has been mentioned above, CBS and PAX-TV have quite friendly or â€Å"peaceful’ slogans, which they used as promos in broadcasting; this turn seems likable to the conservative audience. Both networks tend to focus on nuclear family values, affiliation to Christianity and material well-being or ability to provide for oneself (Johnson, 2004, pp.406-407). Meehan and Byars take a little different approach and state that Lifetime has gradually shaped itself as a liberal feminist channel and â€Å"seized† in the 1980s a new audience, independent females with white-collar jobs (Meehan Byars, 2004, p. 94). One of the most powerful tools of reaching the target group was the creation and display of the company’s own films, dedicated to the occupational and interpersonal issues in working women’s life: â€Å"Both The Good Fight and Shame illustrated Lifetime’s operational definition of â€Å"television for women† during the emergent period† (Meehan Byars, 2004, p.96). Further, the network began to employ the characters of female officers, detectives and FBA agents, so there appeared the first female superheroes. The product was conceptually novel and thus met a fully expected response, the group’s adherence to Lifetime. In the present day, this segmentation has become even more obvious: for instance, there are networks for minority groups, such as Galavision and Telefutura, developing networks for children like Qubo and ThinkBright and specialized sports networks for those men who prefer to receive comprehensive sports news without switching between channels. However, the abovementioned companies use much simpler tools of spread amongst the target audience, including language (native to the minority group), interesting intellectual games and scientific problems for minors and focus on soccer and baseball most American men are interested in. Both articles, being addressed in the paper, identify a set of values the networks communicate for the purpose of obtaining their target viewers. In particular, CBS and PAX-TV broadcast explicit stories about self-sufficient and mature people, who dedicate themselves to their family and career; moreover, Johnson asserts the importance of â€Å"middleness† (Johnson, 2004, p. 408), which means both the corresponding geographic location and politically neutral views, which reconcile the right and the left. Conservatism as valuable by itself is often communicated through showing global and American cultural anomalies and positioning the traditional, time-honored lifestyle as a way of avoiding problems and succeeding in social life and work. In addition, order to achieve the admiration of â€Å"ordinary Americans†, CBS and PAX-TV also rely heavily upon the American dream, or realization of all dimensions of life through hard work and observance of religious principles; for this purpose, they include the â€Å"true† TV-stories about modest self-made Americans. The â€Å"telefeminist† network, in order to maintain customer loyalty, nowadays also orients to such values as love, family, as opposed to female strength, stressed in the early 1990s (Meehan and Byars, 2004, p.102). Intrafamilial harmony also becomes the emphasis in Lifetime’s films, which depict the peaceful coexistence of the couple of professionals, genuinely motivated for their job, but also interested in preserving their marriage and family as a source of support. However, it is possible to exemplify an alternative strategy, which can be categorized as â€Å"broadening of focus†, which consists in the attempt to respond the questions most Americans ask to themselves. For instance, ABC frequently broadcasts reality series (e.g. â€Å"Lost†) to define the degree to which a person might change under the new or stressful conditions; however, such TV-product also implicitly reveals the importance of the American dream and value of a self-made personality, capable of resisting real-life challenges. Works cited Johnson, V. â€Å"CBS, PAX-TV, and â€Å"heartland† values in a neo-network era†. In The Television Studies Reader, edited by Robert C.Allen and Annette Hill. Routlege, 2004, pp. 403-416. Meehan, E. and Byars, J. â€Å"Telefeminism. How Lifetime Got Its Groove, 1984 -1997†. In The Television Studies Reader, edited by Robert C.Allen and Annette Hill. Routlege, 2004, pp. 92-104.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Objectivity in Journalism Essay -- Reporter News Reporting Events Essa

Objectivity in Journalism Public journalism has changed much during its existence. Papers are striving to actively involve readers in the news development. It goes beyond telling the news to embrace a broader mission of improving the quality of public life. The American style of journalism is based on objectivity and separates us from the bias found in most European partisan papers. American journalism is becoming too vigilant in being objective that the dedication to investigating stories tends to be missing in the writing. Public journalism works to incorporate concepts from partisan and objective writing to increase the flow of information and improve the quality of public life. The partisan press is presented as an opinion newspaper which generally argues one political point of view or pushes the plan of the party that subsidizes the paper.1 This style is dominantly used in Great Britain. Leonard Doyle, the foreign editor at The Independent in London, feels that this is the best style of delivering news. Partisan journalism strikes at the passion and immediacy of the subjects covered in the news. The reports are based on more narrow discoveries of facts and evidence. The partisan news is very competitive which in turn creates popularity for reading the papers. Doyle says that the British are among the best informed in the world.2 The 20th century American style of news deals with objectivity. This style distinguishes factual reports from opinion columns. Reporters strive to remain neutral towards the issues they cover, and allow readers to make their judgments.3 The Washington Post?s Michael Getler describes that news that is most beneficial should be delivered in a method that is bey... ...se information that is bias and opinionated. The most notable aspect in European partisan papers is that one can sense the desire and interest the writer has in the topic by their opinions and explanations. I feel that if Americans took the European approach, more people would be attracted to reading papers and interacting with the information they are given, and in turn there could be a better informed nation. Works Cited ?Brits vs. Yanks: Who Does Journalism Right 2004. Columbia Journalism Review. Issue 3: May/June. . Campbell, Richard. Media & Culture: an introduction to mass communication. Bedford/St. Martin?s: Boston, N.Y. 2005. Cunningham, Brent. ?Re-thinking Objectivity.? 2003. Columbia Journalism Review. Issue 4: July/August. . Objectivity in Journalism Essay -- Reporter News Reporting Events Essa Objectivity in Journalism Public journalism has changed much during its existence. Papers are striving to actively involve readers in the news development. It goes beyond telling the news to embrace a broader mission of improving the quality of public life. The American style of journalism is based on objectivity and separates us from the bias found in most European partisan papers. American journalism is becoming too vigilant in being objective that the dedication to investigating stories tends to be missing in the writing. Public journalism works to incorporate concepts from partisan and objective writing to increase the flow of information and improve the quality of public life. The partisan press is presented as an opinion newspaper which generally argues one political point of view or pushes the plan of the party that subsidizes the paper.1 This style is dominantly used in Great Britain. Leonard Doyle, the foreign editor at The Independent in London, feels that this is the best style of delivering news. Partisan journalism strikes at the passion and immediacy of the subjects covered in the news. The reports are based on more narrow discoveries of facts and evidence. The partisan news is very competitive which in turn creates popularity for reading the papers. Doyle says that the British are among the best informed in the world.2 The 20th century American style of news deals with objectivity. This style distinguishes factual reports from opinion columns. Reporters strive to remain neutral towards the issues they cover, and allow readers to make their judgments.3 The Washington Post?s Michael Getler describes that news that is most beneficial should be delivered in a method that is bey... ...se information that is bias and opinionated. The most notable aspect in European partisan papers is that one can sense the desire and interest the writer has in the topic by their opinions and explanations. I feel that if Americans took the European approach, more people would be attracted to reading papers and interacting with the information they are given, and in turn there could be a better informed nation. Works Cited ?Brits vs. Yanks: Who Does Journalism Right 2004. Columbia Journalism Review. Issue 3: May/June. . Campbell, Richard. Media & Culture: an introduction to mass communication. Bedford/St. Martin?s: Boston, N.Y. 2005. Cunningham, Brent. ?Re-thinking Objectivity.? 2003. Columbia Journalism Review. Issue 4: July/August. .

Monday, January 13, 2020

IOP on Glass, Eyes, and Doll’s Essay

Imagery; vivid descriptive language that appeals to one or more of the senses (sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste). The first impression of a person that someone gets will always color the image of the person. Everything about how someone looks and acts creates how that person is viewed by others. But when this image is controlled by others or the person just isn’t strong enough to show their true self, their identity is twisted into something almost unrecognizable. Henrik Ibsen, Zora Neale Hurston, and Tennessee Williams use the imagery connected with their lead female characters to show how society tries to put individuals down with false generalizations to hide women’s identities. The authors use the imagery of clothing to address how family members try to mold the women below them in power to their image of their character. For the Sternberg’s fancy dress ball Torvald want’s his wife Nora to dress up, â€Å"†¦ and Torvald wants me to go as a Neapolitan fisher-girl,†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (Ibsen 37). The Neapolitan fisher girls are girls from Naples, Italy often thought of as possessing a very classic Grecian beauty. These fisher girls have been subjects of many works of art such as paintings and statues. With Torvald making Nora dress up as a Neapolitan fisher girl he is making her into something beautiful and to be appraised like a piece of art. This image of Nora being beautiful like a painting is Torvald’s way of putting Nora beneath him. He dresses her up and parade’s her among their friends while all the while taking ownership of her beauty. Nora doesn’t get to choose what she wears to this ball and she is not recorded say ing a word to anyone at the party. Torvald even commands Nora to leave the party after she has finished her dance as he doesn’t want anyone being near her. Nora’s identity is lost in the imagery of her Neapolitan fisher-girl costume and Torvald’s control of her dress. By the same token Janie in Their Eyes Were Watching God is forced to wear head rags by her husband Joe. â€Å"The business of the head-rag irked her endlessly. But Jody was set on it. Her hair was NOT going to show in the store,† (Hurston 55). The imagery of Janie’s head-rags suggests that she is Joe’s property. Janie’s hair is her personal symbol of power,strength, and identity. Joe by making Janie cover her hair up in head-rags is symbolically stifling Janie’s power and identity. Without her individuality Janie is nothing but what Joe makes out of her, which is his wife. And society too will only see Janie’s image as Joe makes her image to be . Laura from The Glass Menagerie is also suffered to a similar fate as Nora and Janie as her mother forces her to wear chest enhancements. â€Å"‘Now take a look at yourself. No, wait! Wait just a moment- I have an idea!’ Amanda produces two powder puffs which she wraps in handkerchiefs and stuffs in Laura’s bosom. ‘Mother, what are you doing? They’re called gay deceivers! †¦ I won’t wear them!’ â€Å" (Williams 120). Similarly the imagery of the powder puffs implies that Laura is the perfect young woman that Amanda invisions of her. With Amanda putting the powder puffs down Laura’s dress she is trying to envision Laura as a perfect young woman. But Laura just is not this perfect girl who everyone loves and adores like Amanda wants to see Laura as. The imagery of Laura’s deceivingly good figure signifies that people will perceive her as a perfect young woman. Nora and Janie’s imagery of the past and their memories is used against them to paint false images of their identities. Near the end of the play, Torvald has just found out of what Nora had done in the past to save him and utters this simple and resonant statement, â€Å"And I must sink to such miserable depths because of a thoughtless woman!† (72). With this sentence Torvald is making Nora seem like a terrible woman who is mindless to any thought of her husband. Even though much earlier in the play Nora tells Mrs.Linde that she only borrowed money so that her husband wouldn’t die from his illness. Torvald just judges Nora’s image by her actions, not the motives behind her actions. And this paints an entirely false image of Nora as being thoughtless and uncaring about her husband. When in any case Nora was just looking out for her husband, being anything but thoughtless and uncaring. The Victorian society Nora lives in is also as cruel to someone in her position. It goes without saying that the man is always the one to handle the money and the well being of the family. And by Nora borrowing money by herself she is breaking the rigid gender roles that their society has set in place for women. So society will also look down on Nora as a disgraceful woman because of her past actions. Janie is in a similar situation when coming home from the Everglades is judged by her neighbors. â€Å"They passed nations through their mouths. They sat in judgement. Seeing the woman as she was made them remember the envy they had stored up from other times. So they chewed up the back parts of their minds and swallowed with relish,† (1-2). The people of Eatonville, especially the women had always been jealous of the attention Janie had gotten from men for her looks. And with the knowledge that Janie had ran off with a younger man in the past the people think of Janie as a absurd fool. But they don’t know that Janie with all her suffering and joy that she lived through is incredibly wise. The imagery of Janie’s actions or more so the memory of her actions, has the people of her community believing that Janie is nothing more than a lost old woman, falling for the false love of a young man. Janie’s individuality as a woman who is wise and has lived through many tough times is taken away from her as Eatonville reduces her to just a love sick woman. Hurston, Williams, and Ibsen use the imagery of objects to display how people on the outsides of the characters lives perceive them and their individuality. When Jim is over at the Wingfields apartment Laura is telling of how much she loves the unicorn from her glass menagerie. â€Å" You see how the light shines through him? †¦ I shouldn’t be partial but he is my favorite one†¦ Haven’t you noticed the single horn on his forehead? †¦Ã¢â‚¬  (143-144). The imagery of Laura’s favorite glass ornament, the unicorn, represents how people in society see Laura. Like the unicorn which light shines through, Laura’s disposition and identity is completely see through. Every facet of her personality is easy to see as she is but a incredibly shy and timid girl. Laura’s love for the unicorn is because of it’s peculiarity of the horn that separates him from the other glass horses in her collection. The imagery of this unique glass unicorn represents Laura’s own individual separation from other girls. Everyone notices that Laura is uniquely different, like her glass unicorn she loves so much.In the same way as the unicorn describes Laura, the Christmas tree in the Helmer’s home describes Nora. â€Å"Hide the Christmas tree carefully Helen. Be sure the children do not see it till this evening, when it is dressed †¦ And what is in this parcel? No no! you mustn’t see that until this evening,† (5 & 7). The image of the splendid and elusive Christmas tree in A Doll’s House expresses how Nora’s identity is seen by the society around her. The Christmas tree serves the function as an ornament in the household and Nora just like the tree is ornamental in the home. She doesn’t take care of the children, or have a job, she just decorates and dresses up for the people of the house as well as the visitors. And as a decoration Nora isn’t able to voice her own opinion or let her identity shine through the pretty things that accessorize her. Nora’s identity is hidden away throughout the play and as the Christmas tree is hid from the children, Nora’s dress is hidden from Torvald so he will not see her. Nora’s identity is hidden from not only the people she knows but also the one’s she is closest to. She is not able to be herself as society shuns Nora’s true identity, as the loving wife she is that would do anything for her husband, such as borrow money without his consent so he can live. Janie is also in Laura and Nora’s situation as the people in her community judge her actions and therefore her identity because of her hair. â€Å"What dat ole forty year ole ‘oman doin’ wid her hair swingin’ down her back lak some young gal?† (2). Just like the two women in the other pieces of literature, the image of Janie’s long hair is utilized by Hurston to show how Janie’s community in Eatonville doesn’t recognize Janie’s true identity. The women on the porch mention that Janie looks like a foolish old woman with her hair all the way down her back like some young woman. The women of Eatonville think Janie is trying to be like a young woman as she has run off with a young man and is now coming back with her hair no longer tied up. This is not the true image of Janie as she is not trying to be a young woman. After all the life that Janie has experienced she keeps her hair down to show that she no longer cares what people in society think of her. But the image of her loose hair to the rest of her society is of a very rebellious and foolish old woman. They want to see her as a married woman being under the thumb of her husband and not as herself. Even though now Janie is trying to show her true identity the community won’t accept that and is blinding themselves by only focusing on her hair to critique Janie in the way they want to think of her. The three authors use the imagery of speech to the character to shape their false identity in the eyes of their family. One day in the store Joe get’s frustrated with Janie’s poor job at cutting some tobacco and insults her about her age. â€Å"A woman stay round uh store till she get old as Methusalem and still can’t cut a little thing like a plug of tobacco!† (78). The image of Methuselah that Joe says to describe Janie is used to show how Joe and Eatonville see Janie when she is in the store. Methuselah is a man from the Bible that is known to be the oldest person to ever live. The allusion to this character is said by Joe to make Janie feel like she is so old that she is ancient. It insults Janie and her character, making her seem old and inefficient for not being able to cut a plug of tobacco after all the time she spends in the store. Eatonville after hearing what Joe has spoken of Janie can see her as an elderly woman who still can’t do simpl e chores around the store. In a likewise manner Amanda says some harsh words to Laura for dropping out of business college and hiding it from her. â€Å"You did all this to deceive me, just for deception? †¦ We won’t have a business career- we’ve given that up because it gave us nervous indigestion! †¦ barely tolerated spinsters living upon the grudging patronage of sister’s husband or brothers wife!† (93-94). In the same way Amanda’s image placed on Laura when she learns she dropped out of business college in secret is used by Williams to show that Amanda see’s Laura as a weak girl with no identity to her. The image of Laura is that she is a fragile girl with little to no way to support herself having left the one opportunity she had to make a future for herself. The imagery of Amanda’s words that Williams writes twists the picture of Laura into a thoughtless and selfish girl, not thinking about anything but her own personal desires. But her identity is not as a thoughtless girl but as a shy and caring young woman. She is seen as continually concerned for her brother, but still throughout most of the play Amanda see’s Laura as being just self involved. The false image of Laura as being self absorbed is enforced by the imagery of Amanda’s harsh words about dropping out of business college. In opposition to Janie and Laura, the pet names Torvald uses for Nora as terms of endearment are actually very insulting terms to her. â€Å"Is my little squirrel come home? †¦ The same little featherhead! †¦ Come come my little skylark, †¦Ã¢â‚¬  (6-7). Comparably Torvald’s words to Nora are suppose to be endearing but with the knowledge of what the animals are is used to paint an unflattering picture of Nora. Squirrels are animals with very small brains and that are generalized as being unintelligent. A featherhead isn’t an animal, but it is implying that Nora’s head isn’t filled with a brain, but is instead filled with feathers. Nothing substantial t hat she can actually make her own thoughts with. Torvald with this term of endearment is suggesting that Nora doesn’t have a brain but just feathers in her head. Furthermore a skylark is a bird that nests on the ground, then being easily destroyed and that are not very distinctive in coloring. This name makes Nora seem plain and foolish. With these pet names of animals that are ordinary Torvald through the imagery of his words is insinuating that Nora is plain and not very bright. Torvald is also putting himself above Nora with his words. He is making it seem like he is the all important person of the house and that he is better than Nora because he is intelligent. Nora’s individuality is taken away from her with Torvald putting above himself and putting her in the background. Nora has no identity when she is with Torvald as he puts her so below himself that he doesn’t believe she can be herself. Tennessee Williams, Henrik Ibsen, and Zora Neale Hurston use the imagery in their works associated with their lead females to portray how society’s views of people is usually false and undermines their individuality. How people are viewed by what they wear, what they own, their past, and what people say to them is a simple way to miss a person’s true identity. These generalized views are easily broken apart when evidence of people’s character is put forward, and this is what get’s society into trouble. These three authors aren’t just writing literature, they are making a statement on how society works. Including how society is wrong and how generalizations about types of people need to be broken in the collective minds of the people so every person is seen as themselves and not as a stereotype. To give everyone their own voice without being prejudged by society’s absurd expectations.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Duncan Yoyo Marketing Plan - 3213 Words

Ducan YoYo- Marketing Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Duncan is positioned as one of the largest Yo-yo manufacturer in the world. The yo-yo boom has been decreased rapidly with the fast pace technology and the invention of more varieties of toys and games. Duncan new product â€Å"Yo-yo Light Keychain† is to be marketed in anticipation of its next comeback. The aim of the Duncan is to maximise economic returns for the corporation by penetrating new markets while further establishing Duncan’s reputation for leading in quality and stylish yo-yos. Core competencies and strengths (such as the positive reputation of Duncan’s yo-yo quality products and the new launch of â€Å"Yo-yo Light Keychain† designed for children to be released in Australia) will†¦show more content†¦In period of time, almost every kid in US had a yoyo. The yo-yo boom unfortunately ended when Duncan went bankrupt in the late 1960s, expensive lawsuit to protect the yo-yo trademark from competitors forced the Duncan family out of business. Flambeau Products, who made Duncan’s plastic yo-yo models, then took over the company and still owns it to this day (Duncan Toys Company A Division of Flambeau 2008). One of Duncan’s successful marketing strategies was in 1995, TV advertisement with the Video Boy commercial which airs nationwide. Commercial positioned yo-yo as the more exciting option to video games and swiped the globe including Australia, Britain and Japan to become yo-yo hotspots. In 1997, Duncan enters into a licensing agreement with Coca-Cola, producing 18 different designs and in 2002, Duncan purchased the assets of Playmaxx Inc and officially securing its position as the number â€Å"one† Yo-yo manufacturer in the world (Duncan Toys Company A Division of Flambeau 2008). In a fast pace technology world, yo-yo’s popularity among the kids continue to decrease with other substitutes of more advanced fun games and toys (ABC Transcript 2003). The Duncan name and trademark has continued to be marketed in anticipation of its next comeback. 2.0 SITUATION ANALYSIS 2.10 INTERNAL Duncan is one of the biggest company’s producing yo-yos today and has been around for roughly 89 years as one of the leading

Saturday, December 28, 2019

COMPARE AND CONTRAST 2 COUNTRIES Free Essay Example, 1500 words

Capitalism entrusts those profits to the entrepreneur or industrialist who invested substantial amounts of money as capital in the firm (Young & Kent, 2004). To maintain these dfferent operations, both systems have different governments to oversee them. Communism holds that the citizens are not above the society. In any circumstance, the good of the society has to be esteemed above the personal needs of the citizens. Capitalism is different because it esteems individual freedoms above all other collective forms of partnership. Essentially, capitalism has an ingrained economic system that is basically self-regulated while in communism, the financial system has to be supervised by the ruling government for it to be able to function as it was intended. Another economically-related factor that demonstrates the difference between communism and capitalism has to do with production processes. In regards to capitalism, private citizens are entrusted with making decisions about price structure and manufacturing limits. In communism, though, it is the government, or community which makes decisions about price structure. Capitalism is based on the efforst of individuals. In capitalist nations such as the United States, from a young age, citizens are taught that their personal effort is the only thing that has the power and capacity to change life and improve the economy. We will write a custom essay sample on COMPARE AND CONTRAST 2 COUNTRIES or any topic specifically for you Only $17.96 $11.86/pageorder now Communism is different because it extols collectivism. Communism encourages its citizens from a young age to believe in the power of equal sharing in all circumstances. This means that it is only through the sharing of jobs that communities can acquire benefits (Harasymiw, 2010). While communism has been responsible for the downfall of different national economies, it was first created in an effort to bring more stability to nations by brigding the gap between the rich and the poor. This is why, unlike capitalism, communisn does not support the acquisition of private property. Communism basically seeks to establish a class-less society in which there are no rich or poor citizens as all people are believed to be equal owners of the community resources. The American government has always sought to encourage the development of free trade in all nations that it seeks to influence (Suri, 2011). The communist system embraced by the Soviet Union sought the opposite by shielding itself as well as all the nations under its influence from global commercial activities. While successive ruling governments in the Soviet Union claimed that this was to protect the system of communism from contamination by Western values, the real reason for refusing to engage in international commerce was to revent Soviet citizens from being exposed to genuine viewpoints which would question the validity of the claims of the totalitarian regime, thus eroding their power.

Thursday, December 19, 2019

1.assess Antioch College s Mission Statement - 909 Words

1.Assess Antioch College’s mission statement as it appears above. What is good about this mission and what would you change? Antioch College’s mission statement clearly state that the goal of the college is to provide a high standard education for students. It also describe its purpose and who it is mentioned for and its value. It is important for those people to involve in social and community engagement in order to succeed and achieve their goals to benefit the community .Therefore scholarship and life experiences are stronger when they are put together. I think excellent in education does not always means you have to achieve something different with the higher education you earned, otherwise you would are ashamed of what you did. It means to challenge yourself and have the knowledge and ability to be able to help other if you can. 2.What is the principle strategy the president of Antioch College is pursuing? The new president of Antioch College, Mark Roosevelt offers free tuition and provides higher academic curriculum for students. They reconstructed and tearing down the old buildings on the campus. His plan is to make the college interesting and would gain more people’s attention. Eventually it would help the college to earn accreditation and someone would try to raise funds for the college or enrolled more students and have them to pay for the tuition. 3.Conduct an environmental scan/situational analysis for Antioch. Antioch College is not going toShow MoreRelatedSda Manual Essay101191 Words   |  405 PagesDivision of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. Used by permission. Texts credited to RV are from The Holy Bible, Revised Version, Oxford University Press, 1911. Printed in U.S.A. 09 08 07 06 5 4 3 2 1 ISBN 0-8280-1947-9 ISBN 0-8280-1948-7 hardcover paperback Printed and distributed by the Review and Herald ® Publishing Association Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 Table of Contents Introduction ..............................................Read MoreStephen P. Robbins Timothy A. Judge (2011) Organizational Behaviour 15th Edition New Jersey: Prentice Hall393164 Words   |  1573 Pagesand permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. To obtain permission(s) to use material from this work, please submit a written request to Pearson Education, Inc., Permissions Department, One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458, or you may fax your request to 201-236-3290. Many of the designations by manufacturers